Currently showing posts tagged: Free Software

more uses for git notes, and hidden treasures in Gerrit

By , October 2, 2013 2:05 pm

I recently blogged about some tools I wrote which harness the notes feature of git to help with the process of porting commits from one branch to another. Since then I’ve discovered a couple more consumers of this functionality which are pretty interesting: palaver, and Gerrit.

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Easier upstreaming / back-porting of patch series with git

By , September 19, 2013 9:22 pm

Have you ever needed to port a selection of commits from one git branch to another, but without doing a full merge? This is a common challenge, e.g.

  • forward-porting / upstreaming bugfixes from a stable release branch to a development branch, or
  • back-porting features from a development branch to a stable release branch.

Of course, git already goes quite some way to making this possible:

  • git cherry-pick can port individual commits, or even a range of commits (since git 1.7.2) from anywhere, into the current branch.
  • git cherry can compare a branch with its upstream branch and find which commits have been upstreamed and which haven’t. This command is particularly clever because, thanks to git patch-id, it can correctly spot when a commit has been upstreamed, even when the upstreaming process resulted in changes to the commit message, line numbers, or whitespace.
  • git rebase --onto can transplant a contiguous series of commits onto another branch.

It’s not always that easy …

However, on the occasions when you need to sift through a larger number of commits on one branch, and port them to another branch, complications can arise:

  • If cherry-picking a commit results in changes to its patch context, git patch-id will return a different SHA-1, and subsequent invocations of git cherry will incorrectly tell you that you haven’t yet ported that commit.
  • If you mess something up in the middle of a git rebase, recovery can be awkward, and git rebase --abort will land you back at square one, undoing a lot of your hard work.
  • If the porting process is big enough, it could take days or even weeks, so you need some way of reliably tracking which commits have already been ported and which still need porting. In this case you may well want to adopt a divide-and-conquer approach by sharing out the porting workload between team-mates.
  • The more the two branches have diverged, the more likely it is that conflicts will be encountered during cherry-picking.
  • There may be commits within the range you are looking at which after reviewing, you decide should be excluded from the port, or at least porting them needs to be postponed to a later point.

It could be argued that all of these problems can be avoided with the right branch and release management workflows, and I don’t want to debate that in this post. However, this is the real world, and sometimes it just happens that you have to deal with a porting task which is less than trivial. Well, that happened to me and my team not so long ago, so I’m here to tell you that I have written and published some tools to solve these problems. If that’s of interest, then read on!

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new music video: acoustic version of Jóga by Björk, with Emma Smith

By , September 18, 2013 1:20 pm

I’m a long-time fan of Björk, and was recently lucky enough to snarf a spare ticket to a show here in London at the end of her Biophilia tour. It was a fairly insane show (in a good way), involving an all female Icelandic choir, a drummer, an organ, a musically aware lightning bolt generator, a pin-barrel harp, and David Attenborough (obviously). Really impressive to see how she’s still trail-blazing rather than just churning out the old favourites (although some of the latter were presented in imaginative new ways).

On a related note, back in February I revisited my old haunt the Royal Academy of Music to record/film a version of Björk’s famous tune Jóga, arranged and sang by the amazing and consistently entertaining singer Emma Smith. Yesterday I finally finished the video editing (done with the awesome Kdenlive video editor which is Free Software), and here is the result. Hope you enjoy it!

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music industry learns nothing from the Avid / Sibelius saga?

By , February 25, 2013 11:46 pm

UPDATE 26/02/2013: Daniel has replied to this post, and I have replied to his reply.

As George Santayana famously said, “those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it”. In light of recent news regarding music notation software, I would add with some disappointment and frustration that those who choose to ignore the past are also condemned to repeat it.

For those of you who don’t already know, Sibelius is a proprietary software product for music notation which has for many years been one of the most popular choices for professional musicians and composers. For many of the more experienced customers in the technology industry who have already been burned in the past, a heavy reliance on a single technology is enough to trigger alarm bells – what if the company providing that technology goes bust, or decides to change direction and cease work on it, or simply does an awful job (*cough* Microsoft *cough*) of maintaining and supporting that technology? Then you’re up a certain creek without the proverbial paddle.

In the IT industry, this is a well-known phenomenon called vendor lock-in. A powerful movement based on Free Software was born in the early eighties to free computer users from this lock-in, and is now used on billions of devices world-wide. You may have never heard of Free Software, but if you own an Android phone or a “broadband” router, or have ever used the Firefox browser or Google Chrome, you have already used it. The vast majority of the largest companies in the world all run Free Software in their datacentres around the world; for example, every time you access Google or Facebook you are (indirectly) using Free Software.

What does any of this have to do with Sibelius? Continue reading 'music industry learns nothing from the Avid / Sibelius saga?'»

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