Currently showing posts tagged: architecture

Report from the OpenStack PTG in Dublin

By , March 9, 2018 7:30 pm

Last week I attended OpenStack’s PTG (Project Teams Gathering) in Dublin. This event happens every 6 months in a different city, and is a fantastic opportunity for OpenStack developers and upstream contributors to get together and turbo-charge the next phase of collaboration.

I wrote a private report for my SUSE colleagues summarising my experience, but then Colleen posted her report publicly, which made me realise that it would be far more in keeping with OpenStack’s Four Opens to publish mine online. So here it is!

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Abstraction As A Service

By , December 19, 2017 7:55 pm

The birth of abstraction layers

The last five decades of computing have seen a gradual progression of architectural abstraction layers. Around 50 years ago, IBM mainframes gained virtualization capabilities. Despite explosive progress in the sophistication of hardware following Moore’s Law, there wasn’t too much further innovation in abstraction layers in server computing until well after the dawn of the microcomputer era, in the early 2000s, when virtualization suddenly became all the rage again. (I heard a rumour that this was due to certain IBM patents expiring, but maybe that’s an urban myth.) Different types of hypervisors emerged, including early forms of containers.

Then we started to realise that a hypervisor wasn’t enough, and we needed a whole management layer to keep control of the new “VM sprawl” problem which had arisen. A whole bunch of solutions appeared, including the concept of “cloud”, but many were proprietary, and so after a few years OpenStack came along to the rescue!

The cloud era

But then we realised that managing OpenStack itself was a pain, and someone had the idea that rather than building a separate management layer for managing OpenStack, we could just use OpenStack to manage itself! And so OpenStack on OpenStack, or Triple-O as it’s now known, was born.

Within and alongside OpenStack, several other new exciting trends emerged: Software-Defined Networking (SDN), Software-Defined Storage (e.g. Ceph), etc. So the umbrella term Software-Defined Infrastructure was coined to refer to this group of abstraction layers.

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Announcing OpenStack’s Self-healing SIG

By , November 24, 2017 4:15 pm

One of the biggest promises of the cloud vision was the idea that all infrastructure could be managed in a policy-driven fashion, reacting to failures and other events by automatically healing and optimising services.

In OpenStack, most of the components required to implement such an architecture already exist, and are nicely scoped, for the most part without too much overlap:

However, there is not yet a clear strategy within the community for how these should all tie together. (The OPNFV community is arguably further ahead in this respect, but hopefully some of their work could be applied outside NFV-specific environments.)

Designing a new SIG

To address this, I organised an unofficial kick-off meeting at the PTG in Denver, at which it became clear that there was sufficient interest in this idea from many of the above projects in order to create a new “Self-healing” SIG. However, there were still open questions:

  1. What exactly should be the scope of the SIG? Should it be for developers and operators, or also end users?
  2. What should the name be? Is “self-healing” good enough, or should it also include, say, non-failure scenarios like optimization?

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