Currently showing posts tagged: cloud

Announcing OpenStack’s Self-healing SIG

By , November 24, 2017 4:15 pm

One of the biggest promises of the cloud vision was the idea that all infrastructure could be managed in a policy-driven fashion, reacting to failures and other events by automatically healing and optimising services.

In OpenStack, most of the components required to implement such an architecture already exist, and are nicely scoped, for the most part without too much overlap:

However, there is not yet a clear strategy within the community for how these should all tie together. (The OPNFV community is arguably further ahead in this respect, but hopefully some of their work could be applied outside NFV-specific environments.)

Designing a new SIG

To address this, I organised an unofficial kick-off meeting at the PTG in Denver, at which it became clear that there was sufficient interest in this idea from many of the above projects in order to create a new “Self-healing” SIG. However, there were still open questions:

  1. What exactly should be the scope of the SIG? Should it be for developers and operators, or also end users?
  2. What should the name be? Is “self-healing” good enough, or should it also include, say, non-failure scenarios like optimization?

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Cloud rearrangement for fun and profit

By , May 17, 2015 4:42 am

In a populated compute cloud, there are several scenarios in which it’s beneficial to be able to rearrange VM guest instances into a different placement across the hypervisor hosts via migration (live or otherwise). These use cases typically fall into three categories:

  1. Rebalancing – spread the VMs evenly across as many physical VM host machines as possible (conceptually similar to vSphere DRS). Example use cases:
  2. Consolidation – condense VMs onto fewer physical VM host machines (conceptually similar to vSphere DPM). Typically involves some degree of defragmentation. Example use cases:
  3. Evacuation – free up physical servers:

Whilst one-shot manual or semi-automatic rearrangement can bring immediate benefits, the biggest wins often come when continual rearrangement is automated. The approaches can also be combined, e.g. first evacuate and/or consolidate, then rebalance on the remaining physical servers.

Other custom rearrangements may be required according to other IT- or business-driven policies, e.g. only rearrange VM instances relating to a specific workload, in order to increase locality of reference, reduce latency, respect availability zones, or facilitate other out-of-band workflows or policies (such as data privacy or other legalities).

In the rest of this post I will expand this topic in the context of OpenStack, talk about the computer science behind it, propose a possible way forward, and offer a working prototype in Python.

If you’re in Vancouver for the OpenStack summit which starts this Monday and you find this post interesting, ping me for a face-to-face chat!

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OpenStack Paris workshop: Automated Deployment of an HA Cloud

By , November 1, 2014 7:39 pm

6 months after its debut in Atlanta, the HA workshop happening again in Paris, this Monday (16:20, Room 241)! If you plan on attending and didn’t already see Florian’s blog post, please get downloading and installing the prerequisite files quick, because downloading them over hotel or conference wifi is likely to be painful. (N.B. Unless you have a really strong reason not to, please go with the VirtualBox option, because there are more pitfalls when using KVM+libvirt.)

However if you’re already on the way to Paris, don’t despair, because we’ll also do our best to make the files available at the SUSE booth. And failing that, you can still just turn up, enjoy the show, and then try the hands-on exercise any time later at your own leisure!

In case you have no idea what I’m talking about, here’s some brief history:

Back before the last OpenStack summit in Atlanta in May, I managed to persuade Florian Haas to join me in an endeavour which some might view as slightly insane: run a 90 minute hands-on workshop in which we’d have every attendee build a Highly Available OpenStack cloud on their laptop, from scratch.

With so many moving parts and a vast range of different hardware involved, it certainly wasn’t plain sailing, but by the power of Vagrant and VirtualBox, I think overall it was a success.

Since then, we’ve been working extremely hard to improve the workshop materials based on lessons learnt last time. So what’s new? Well, firstly the workshop environment has been upgraded from Havana Icehouse (SUSE Cloud 4 vs. version 3 in May), and quite a lot of polish has been applied, since in May the HA code was still relatively new.

Secondly, we’ve added support for building the cloud using KVM+libvirt (although VirtualBox is still recommended for a smoother ride).

Thirdly, the documentation is way more comprehensive, and should help you avoid many common pitfalls.

Hope to see you at the workshop, and please come and say hello to us at the SUSE booth!

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How to never EVER lose your phone contacts again

By , July 30, 2011 8:31 pm

It continually astonishes me how often I see facebook status updates / group invites / tweets / emails from friends and acquaintances saying something to the effect of “ARGH my iPhone / Blackberry / Nokia phone has been stolen / lost / eaten by my pet donkey and I lost everyone’s numbers, please can you all send me your numbers!!”

People, it’s 2011 already! Whilst technology is still far from perfect, it landed a man on the moon 42 years ago way before mobile phones existed, and certainly solved this particular problem of disappearing phones several years ago.  So for those of you who still haven’t figured this out, without further ado I will outline a solution which should only cost 10 minutes of your life and ensure you never have to broadcast a panicked message cursing your pet donkey and asking everyone to send you their numbers.

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