Currently showing posts tagged: VMware

Cloud rearrangement for fun and profit

By , May 17, 2015 4:42 am

In a populated compute cloud, there are several scenarios in which it’s beneficial to be able to rearrange VM guest instances into a different placement across the hypervisor hosts via migration (live or otherwise). These use cases typically fall into three categories:

  1. Rebalancing – spread the VMs evenly across as many physical VM host machines as possible (conceptually similar to vSphere DRS). Example use cases:
  2. Consolidation – condense VMs onto fewer physical VM host machines (conceptually similar to vSphere DPM). Typically involves some degree of defragmentation. Example use cases:
  3. Evacuation – free up physical servers:

Whilst one-shot manual or semi-automatic rearrangement can bring immediate benefits, the biggest wins often come when continual rearrangement is automated. The approaches can also be combined, e.g. first evacuate and/or consolidate, then rebalance on the remaining physical servers.

Other custom rearrangements may be required according to other IT- or business-driven policies, e.g. only rearrange VM instances relating to a specific workload, in order to increase locality of reference, reduce latency, respect availability zones, or facilitate other out-of-band workflows or policies (such as data privacy or other legalities).

In the rest of this post I will expand this topic in the context of OpenStack, talk about the computer science behind it, propose a possible way forward, and offer a working prototype in Python.

If you’re in Vancouver for the OpenStack summit which starts this Monday and you find this post interesting, ping me for a face-to-face chat!

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CompuTrainer on Linux

By , June 20, 2009 7:13 pm

Finally started using my CompuTrainer a bit more. Just rode 20km in the lounge with the computer pacing me at 200 Watts. After so much riding with guys way stronger than me, the temptation to draft the computer is difficult to resist. However in the last 500 metres it spontaneously decided to make a sprint for the finish line – the bloody cheek! Obviously I couldn’t allow a bunch of transistors to beat me so I sprinted after it and hit the finish line 0.05 seconds ahead, narrowly avoiding embarassment. Next step is to start doing brick sessions
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