Currently showing posts tagged: github

Why and how to correctly amend GitHub pull requests

By , March 24, 2015 3:00 pm

Like many F/OSS developers, I’m a heavy user of GitHub, collaborating on many projects which use the typical “fork & pull” workflow based on pull requests. The GitHub documentation on pull requests covers this workflow fairly comprehensively, but there seems to be one area which is significantly lacking in detail: why and how to amend existing pull requests. The article simply says:

After your pull request is sent, any new commits pushed to your branch will automatically be added to the pull request. This is especially useful if you need to make more changes.

The problem is that this completely ignores the fact that there are often very good reasons for amending existing commits within the pull request, not just for adding new commits it.

Why amend an existing pull request?

A peer review cycle can potentially reveal many issues which make the pull request unready for merging, e.g.

  • typos
  • bugs in the proposed code changes
  • missing features in the proposed code changes
  • incomplete test coverage
  • incomplete documentation changes
  • style inconsistencies (including whitespace issues)
  • incorrect or incomplete commit messages
  • the commits violate the rule of one logical change per commit
  • some changes are outside the scope of the pull request

This is of course what makes peer review of pull requests so valuable: the problems can be addressed even before they hit the master branch, which helps maintain high quality in the development trunk. But then how do we address the issues?

Continue reading 'Why and how to correctly amend GitHub pull requests'»

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managing your github notifications inbox with mutt

By , October 5, 2014 1:59 pm

Like many F/OSS developers, I’m a heavy user of GitHub. This means I interact with other developers via GitHub multiple times a day. GitHub has a very nice notifications system which lets me know when there has been some activity on a project I’m collaborating on.

I’m a fan of David Allen’s GTD (“Getting Things Done”) system, and in my experience I get the best results by minimising the number of inboxes I have to look at every day. So I use another great feature of GitHub, which is the ability to have notification emails delivered directly to your email inbox. This means I don’t have to keep checking https://github.com/notifications in addition to my email inbox.

However, this means that I receive GitHub notifications in two places. Wouldn’t it be nice if when I read them in my email inbox, GitHub could somehow realise and mark them read at https://github.com/notifications too, so that when I look there, I don’t end up getting reminded about notifications I’ve already seen in my inbox? Happily the folks at GitHub already thought of this too, and come up with a solution:

If you read a notification email, it’ll automatically be marked as read in the Notifications section. An invisible image is embedded in each mail message to enable this, which means that you must allow viewing images from notifications@github.com in order for this feature to work.

https://help.github.com/articles/configuring-notification-emails/#shared-read-state

But there’s a catch! Like many Linux geeks, I use mutt for reading and writing email. In fact, I’ve been using it since 1997 and I’m still waiting for another MUA to appear which is more powerful and lets me crunch through email faster. However mutt is primarily text-based, which means by default it doesn’t download images when displaying HTML-based email. Of course, it can. But do I want it to automatically open a new tab in my browser every time I encounter an HTML attachment? No! That would slow me down horribly. Even launching a terminal-based HTML viewer such as w3m or links or lynx would be too slow.

So I figured out a better solution. mutt has a nice message-hook feature where you can configure it to automatically execute mutt functions for any message matching specific criteria just before it displays the message. So we can use that to pipe the whole email to a script whenever a message is being read for the first time:

message-hook "(~N|~O) ~f notifications@github.com" "push '<pipe-message>read-github-notification\n'"

(~N|~O) matches mails which have the N flag (meaning new unread email) or O (meaning old unread email) set.

The read-github-notifications script reads the email on STDIN, extracts the URL of the 1-pixel read notification beacon <img> embedded in the HTML attachment, and sends an HTTP request for that image, so that github knows the notification has been read.

This means an extra delay of 0.5 seconds or so when viewing a notification email, but for me it’s a worthwhile sacrifice.

If you want to try it, simply download the script and stick it somewhere on your $PATH, and then add the above line to your ~/.muttrc file.

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